Beverly Billingsly borrows a book [kit] /

Beverly is thrilled to finally check out a book with her own library card, but when she accidentally keeps the book too long she worries that she'll have to pay a huge fine or go to jail. Full description

Main Author: Stadler, Alexander.
Other Authors: Kaye, Randye.
Format: Kit
Language: English
Published: [United States] : Spoken Arts, 2001
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Review by Booklist Review

Ages 4-7. Beverly Billingsly is excited when she gets her own library card. She borrows a book, Dinosaurs of the Cretaceous Period, which she loves so much she forgets to return it. One of her friends remarks that the library charges about $1,000 for an overdue book. A classmate says that people are put in jail for having an overdue book. Beverly panics, but a nightmare brings her mother into her room with reassuring words. The next day she returns the book and meets a new friend who also loves dinosaurs. This clever story celebrates the feelings of pride and happiness children often have when they get their own library cards. Stadler also humorously captures what happens when unrealistic information spreads (intentionally or not). The gouache-and-ink drawings, outlined in black, are simple in the extreme. Beverly is some sort of little gray animal, and all the characters look as though children could have drawn them. Libraries can always use another book celebrating libraries. Ilene Cooper.

From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Review by Publisher's Weekly Review

In this sympathetic tale of a budding bibliophile, a light-gray animal with bearish ears and a tentative manner receives her first library card and uses it to borrow a volume on dinosaurs. She smiles politely as the green, birdlike librarian tells her the due date. "On Wednesday, after school, she studied the iguanodon. On Thursday and Friday, she read about the ankylosaurus. She spent several days building a prehistoric jungle habitat," then realizes the book is overdue. Fearful of a fine (or jail, according to a coyote-like schoolmate), she avoids the library until her mother discovers the problem and helps her return the overdue book. The beaky librarian lets it slide. In his picture-book debut, Stadler shows that a minor issue can loom large for a child (the heroine, sporting pajamas with the due date stamped all over them, has a nightmare starring a green triceratops with a hairdo much like the librarian's demanding the book). His quavery ink line drawings and filmy gouache palette suggest the work of William Steig, while his nave images of anthropomorphic creatures call to mind Lauren Child's illustrations. A reassuring tale for those experiencing their first bittersweet taste of independence. Ages 3-7. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Review by School Library Journal Review

PreS-K-A tiny gray bear goes to the library every Tuesday, but this week is special. Today she gets her own card. She approaches the librarian, portrayed as a gangly green bird with orange hair and a large beak, gets her card, and looks for a book on dinosaurs. Once it is found, Beverly takes it to the desk and is reminded by Mrs. Del Rubio that it is due on April 7th. Woe is Beverly. April 7th comes and goes, and her book is now late. Her friends tell frightening tales of how she might end up in jail or have to pay a $1000 fine. In the youngster's nightmare, the librarian even morphs into a green triceratops promising to "gobble [her] up" if she doesn't return the book. Happily, when the overdue item is returned, Mrs. Del Rubio notices that it's only two days late and reminds her young borrower to "be more careful next time." There isn't even a fine to pay. Best of all, Beverly makes a new friend who also likes dinosaurs. In addition to the book's weak plot, this librarian is too stereotypical to be believable. She's gawky, bespectacled, and underautomated. As a result, it's unlikely that this title will be a favorite choice for storytimes, class visits, or other presentations. Done in gouache and ink, the illustrations are simple, flat, and purposely two-dimensional. They mimic a childish hand. They're acceptable accompaniments to the story and not overpowering. Unfortunately, the plot, with its central theme of fears and nightmares over an overdue book, is not engaging.-Roxanne Burg, Thousand Oaks Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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